Donauschwaben in den USA


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Mary Lula _Woolsey_ Thornton

 

William Thornton (1770 - 1846)

Information found by TCT 08 January 2013

1820 United States Federal Census William Thornton Sr and Jr Union County Illinois

http://search.ancestry.com/Browse/print_u.aspx?dbid=7734&iid=4433396_00141&pid=&autoprint=true&imageonly=true&client=SUI&version=AMVLZaDzzgg

1820 United States Federal Census William Thornton Sr and Jr Union County Illinois

William Thornton Senior in household of William Thornton Senior, "United States Census, 1820"

name: William Thornton Senior
event place: Not Stated, Union, Illinois
page number: 166
nara publication number: M33
nara roll number: 11
film number: 0506763
digital folder number: 004433396
image number: 00141
Citing this Record

"United States Census, 1820," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XHG3-1YH : accessed 08 Jan 2013), 

William Thornton Senior, Not Stated, Union, Illinois; citing p. 166, NARA microfilm publication M33, roll 11.

 

William Thornton II

 in household of William Thornton II, "United States Census, 1820"

https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XHG3-1Y5

William Thornton II in household of William Thornton II, "United States Census, 1820"
name: William Thornton II
event place: Not Stated, Union, Illinois
page number: 166
nara publication number: M33
nara roll number: 11
film number: 0506763
digital folder number: 004433396
image number: 00141
Citing this Record

"United States Census, 1820," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XHG3-1Y5 : accessed 08 Jan 2013), William Thornton II, Not Stated, Union, Illinois; citing p. 166, NARA microfilm publication M33, roll 11.

 

About 1810 United States Federal Census

http://search.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=7613

About 1810 United States Federal Census

This database details those persons enumerated in the 1810 United States Federal Census, the Third Census of the United States. In addition, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to the actual images of the 1810 Federal Census, copied from the National Archives and Records Administration microfilm, M252, 71 rolls. (If you do not initially find the name on the page that you are linked to, try a few pages forward or backward, as sometimes different pages had the same page number.)

About the 1810 Census:

The official enumeration day of the 1810 census was 6 August 1810. All questions asked were supposed to refer to that date. The enumeration was to be completed within nine months, but the due date was extended by law to ten months. Schedules exist for 17 states and District of Columbia, Georgia territory, Mississippi territory, Louisiana territory, Orleans, Michigan territory, and Illinois territory. There was, however, a district wide loss for District of Columbia, Georgia, Indiana Territory, Mississippi Territory, Louisiana Territory (MO), New Jersey and Tennessee. Partial losses included Illinois Territory, which had only two counties (Randolph is extant, St. Clair is lost.), and OH, all lost except Washington County. Some of the schedules for these states have been re-created using tax lists and other records.

Enumerators of the 1810 census were asked to include the following categories in the census: name of head of household; number of free white males and females in age categories: 0 to 10, 10 to 16, 16 to 26, 26 to 45, 45 and older; number of other free persons except Indians not taxed; number of slaves; and town or district and county of residence. The categories allowed Congress to determine persons residing in the United States for collection of taxes and the appropriation of seats in the House of Representatives. Most entries are arranged in the order of visitation, but some have been rearranged to appear in alphabetical order by initial letter of the surname. Manufacturing schedules are scattered among the 1810 population schedules.

   
   
Arkansas Census, 1819-70
about William Thornton

http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=arcen&h=739266&indiv=try&o_vc=Record:OtherRecord&rhSource=7836

Arkansas Census, 1819-70
about William Thornton
Name: William Thornton
State: AR
County: Clark County
Township: Antoine Township
Year: 1828
Record Type: Tax List
Database: AR 1819-1829 Tax Lists Index

Source Information:

Jackson, Ron V., Accelerated Indexing Systems, comp.. Arkansas Census, 1819-70 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 1999.
Original data: Compiled and digitized by Mr. Jackson and AIS from microfilmed schedules of the U.S. Federal Decennial Census, territorial/state censuses, and/or census substitutes.

Arkansas Census, 1819-70
about William Thornton

http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=arcen&h=739268&indiv=try&o_vc=Record:OtherRecord&rhSource=3542

Name: William Thornton
State: AR
County: Clark County
Township: Antoine Township
Year: 1832
Record Type: Tax List
Database: AR 1830-1839 Tax Lists Index

 

   
U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900
about William Thornton

http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?rank=1&new=1&MSAV=0&msT=1&gss=angs-g&gsfn=William+Robert&gsln=Thornton&mswpn__ftp=Union+County%2c+Illinois%2c+USA&mswpn=2952&mswpn_PInfo=7-%7c0%7c1652393%7c0%7c2%7c3247%7c16%7c0%7c2952%7c0%7c0%7c&msbdy=1775&msbpn__ftp=South+Carolina&msddy=1846&msdpn__ftp=Clark+County%2c+Arkansas%2c+USA&msdpn=6&msdpn_PInfo=5-%7c0%7c1652393%7c0%7c2%7c3246%7c6%7c0%7c0%7c0%7c0%7c&uidh=uv4&mssng0=Mary&mssns0=Woolsey&pcat=ROOT_CATEGORY&h=1218226&recoff=5+6+22&db=WorldMarr_ga&indiv=1

U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900
about William Thornton

I am not sure if this is our ancestors: William Robert Thornton and Mary Lula Woolsey?  TCT

   

 

Information found by TCT 20 December 2011

http://www.mytrees.com/cgi-bin/yaodoqry?THORNTON+William++1793+1795+++++WOOLSEY+Mary+M++All+1+0+1+0+0+0 May have been married in Tennessee in 1794..
# Database Name Name Year Place Family Updated Gen Notes
1 Click to View
ch000770
THORNTON, WILLIAM R 1794 TENN MARY Mar 17 2011 0 good
2 Click to View
carson4
THORNTON, WILLIAM R MARY Mar 21 2011 0 good
3 Click to View
jo002761
THORNTON, WILLIAM R MARY Jan 6 2006 0 some
4 Click to View
ukresult
THORNTON, WILLIAM 1793 0 none

 

   
   
   
William Thornton (1770 - 1846)

http://records.ancestry.com/William_Thornton_records.ashx?pid=41757231

Born in Virginia, USA on 1770 to Abraham Thornton and Elizabeth Martin

This information, above, is suspect.  Abraham Thornton family were Quakers and were evacuated to Nova Scotia after the American Revolution as they were "loyalists"  I cannot find any information that any of them returned to the US.

William married Mary Lula Woolsey and had 11 children. He passed away on 28 Mar 1846 in Clark, Arkansas, USA.

http://www.agsgenealogy.org/databases/pdffiles/AFH/AFH091Mar1971.pdf

This information, above, is suspect.  Is this a descendant of the William Robert Thornton from South Carolina?  and what are the odds of a Mary Lula Woosley??

  West Yorkshire, England, Baptisms, Marriages and Burials, 1512-1812
  • Name: William Thornton

 

Elizabeth Martin (1752 - )

http://records.ancestry.com/Elizabeth_Martin_records.ashx?pid=41861143

Born on 1752. Elizabeth married Abraham Thornton and had 5 children.
Abraham Thornton (1745 - 1796)

http://records.ancestry.com/Abraham_Thornton_records.ashx?pid=41894441

Born in Orange, North Carolina, USA on 1745 to Thomas Thornton and Martha Boykin. Abraham married Elizabeth Martin and had 5 children. He passed away on 1796 in Edgefield, South Carolina, USA.
  West Yorkshire, England, Baptisms, Marriages and Burials, 1512-1812
  • Name: Abraham Thornton

 

Thomas Thornton 

1698-1762

Thomas Thornton

http://records.ancestry.com/Thomas_Thornton_records.ashx?pid=37512818

Parents Unknown
Spouses & Children

Martha Boykin

1707-1754

 

Martha Boykin

1707-1754

Martha Boykin (1707 - 1754)

Born in England on 1707. Martha married Thomas Thornton and had 6 children. She passed away on 1754 in North Carolina, USA.

http://records.ancestry.com/Martha_Boykin_records.ashx?pid=37500359

 
Union county, Illinois history

pdf file on this site

 

Jacob Rantleman, William Thornton and George Hunsaker became

the new commissioners in 1819....

The men who served as constables, appointed by the governor

between 1818 and 1820 were John Meneese, William Shelton,

Samuel Betcher, Sam Hunsaker, Willie Sams, Samuel Sprouse, Isaac

Williams, Jessie Doolen, Sam Hunsaker, Levi T. Holland, Alfred N.

Dilliard, Squire Bone and William Thornton....

In 1940 the county road commissioners were Mr. Landis, Mr.

Mcintosh, Mr. Thornton,...

 

http://libsysdigi.library.uiuc.edu/OCA/Books2008-07/historyofunionco00leon/historyofunionco00leon_djvu.txt

The record of "marks and brands," opened immediately after the county was organized, shows the following men lived in Union County and registered a "brand" for his domestic animals, Jacob Wolf, George Wolf, Edmund Vancil, William Dodd, Samuel Hun- saker, Michael Lindbaugh, David Brown, William Thornton, Joseph Hunsaker,...

Those who had entered land that lies within the county up to and including ISIS were John Yost, Wilkinson Goodwin, George Hunsaker, William Thornton, John Hunsaker,...

Roads were also built from Jonesboro to Vienna, Jonesboro to America, Jonesboro to Cape Girardeau, Jonesboro to Brownsville in Jackson County and from the mouth of the Big Muddy River to Golconda. As agriculture and population increased, mill seats were established and as these came into being, the roads were made to go past the mills enroute to their destinations. An "overseer" and "viewer" was appointed over various sections of the road and the people living within four or five miles on each side of the roads were required to work on their construction and maintainance. This work must have been done without pay since the county records do not show where any payments were made for this type of work in —7— thfl early days of the county. Then as now the "overseers" and "viewers" were changed with a change of county administration. The following names appeared in the county records as holding this office, David Arnold, William Pyle, Ephriam Noel, George Hun- saker, Henry Lamer, Benjamin Meneese, William Alexander, John Hunsaker, Allen McKenzie, Nathan Turpin, Will Waford, Alexandei boggs, Aaron Thornton,...

Jacob Rantleman, William Thornton and George Hunsaker became the new commissioners in 1819 and with them appeared many new names in the records...

A tavern in those days was usually in a private home where a wayfarer might stop and procure drink, food and lodging for himself and hay and shelter for his horse. The price of these services was regulated by the county board as has been mentioned before. Each tavern keeper paid a two dollar license fee and filed a $100 bond. Later these amounts were increased to six dollars and three hundred dollars. William Shelton, Robert Lloyd, Isaac Williams, Sam Putchez, Squire Bone, John Meneese, Jacob Hybarger, George Smiley, John Thornton,...

The men who served as constables, appointed by the governor between 1818 and 1820 were John Meneese, William Shelton, Samuel Betcher, Sam Hunsaker, Willie Sams, Samuel Sprouse, Isaac Williams, Jessie Doolen, Sam Hunsaker, Levi T. Holland, Alfred N. Dilliard, Squire Bone and William Thornton.

The settlement of what are now Anna Precincts was next in size to Jonesboro. Here the following men had entered land as follows:....John Thornton, 80 acres;....

The following men were enlisted from Union County:...Privates,...Azel Thornton...

Reynolds Precinct grew more than any other river section during the period between 1835 and 1850. Entries added here were....Ralph Thornton, 120 acres;...

The additions in Saratoga Precinct were....William Thornton, 42.19 acres;...

Jonesboro was increased by...Azel Thornton, 34.25 acres...

In 1940 the county road commissioners were Mr. Landis, Mr. Mcintosh, Mr. Thornton,...

   
   
 

Original Settlers of Union County, Illinois

Preemption before 1817

Illinois Genealogy Trails

Submitted by Jeana Gallagher

http://genealogytrails.com/ill/union/original%20settlers.html

"1811"

Name

Date

Location

Thornton, William

18 Jan 1811

11-1E Sec 6

"1812"

Name

Date

Location

Brown, John

15 Oct 1812

unknown

Hollerman, Jacob

8 Feb 1812

11-3W Sec 24

Holleman, Josiah

8 Feb 1812

unknown poss 13-1W

"1814"

Name

Date

Location

Borera, Stephen

23 June 1814

11-4W Sec 14

Brown, George Jr.

20 Jan 1814

12-1W Sec 19

Godwin, Wilkerson

10 Feb 1814

unknown poss 13-1W

Hunsaker, Jacob

3 Jan 1814

unknown

Keath, Elizabeth

26 Feb 1814

13-2W Sec 19/20

Lawrence, William

9 Sept 1814

13-2W Sec 36

McBride, Micajah

1 Oct 1814

13-1W Sec 34

McBride, Richard

1 Oct 1814

12-1W Sec 20

Stalcup, Peter

26 Feb 1814

11-3W Sec 15

there are more names

Union County History

http://genealogytrails.com/ill/union/index.html

Source: HISTORY OF ALEXANDER, UNION AND PULASKI COUNTIES, ILLINOIS, Edited by William Henry Perrin, Chicago: O. L. Baskin and Company, Historical Publishers, 183 Lake Street, 1883, pgs 266, 270, 285, 357.
In the year 1803--just 80 years ago--the first white settlement was made in the territory now comprising Union County. Two families, Abram Hunsaker and George Wolf, came down the Ohio River and up the Cache, hunting and fishing and finally started on an overland route. They camped one night a short distance from where Jonesboro now is. They found game and water plentiful and got busy building cabins.
In the year 1809 in the south part of what is now Union County, three families named Lawrence and the William Clapp family settled on Mill Creek. In a short time after this, Stokes settlement was occupied by John Stokes, William Gwinn, George Evans and Thomas Standard.
The act creating Union County bears the date of January 2, 1818. It is entitled, "An act adding a part of Pope County to Johnson County, and forming a new county out of Johnson County."
The site where Jonesboro now stands was selected in the Spring of 1816 and so named for a Dr. Jones. Another site for a county seat was selected, but quite a contest sprung up and the Commissioners selected the site of John Grammer's farm.
More Early History
   
   
 

Prescott, Arkansas

Prescott, Arkansas

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bbyf9FgTq5g&feature=related

Driving in Prescott, AR. Filmed on July 21st 2011

YouTube video

   
   
   
 
 

History of Territories and States Visited by Thornton Family

History of South Carolina

https://wikimediafoundation.org/w/index.php?title=L11_1116_RPFP-orig_US/en/US&utm_source=B11_1116_RapidTestAB_btPf&utm_medium=sitenotice&utm_campaign=C11_1116_RapidTestAB_US&language=en&uselang=en&country=US&referrer=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FHistory_of_South_Carolina

History of South Carolina

https://wikimediafoundation.org/w/index.php?title=L11_1116_RPFP-orig_US/en/US&utm_source=B11_1116_RapidTestAB_btPf&utm_medium=sitenotice&utm_campaign=C11_1116_RapidTestAB_US&language=en&uselang=en&country=US&referrer=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FHistory_of_South_Carolina

          South Carolina is one of the 13 original colonies of the United States. European exploration began in 1540, but the explorers brought European diseases that decimated the local Indian population. It was founded in 1663. The English colony of the Province of Carolina was started in Charleston in 1670, with wealthy planters and their slaves, coming from the British Caribbean colony of Barbados. Colonists overthrew the proprietors after the Yamasee War, pushing back the American Indians in 1715-1717. In 1719 the colony was officially made a crown colony, and North Carolina was split off and made into a separate colony in 1729.

South Carolina banded together with the other colonies to oppose British taxation in the Stamp Act Crisis of 1765, and played a major role in resisting Britain. It became independent in March 1776 and joined the United States of America.[1][2] The Revolution was bloody and hard fought in 1780-81, as the British invaded, captured the American army and finally was driven out.

Colonial period

The Carolina Colonies

By the end of the 16th century, the Spanish and French had left the area of South Carolina after several reconnaissance missions and failed colonization attempts. In 1629, Charles I, King of England, granted his attorney general a charter to everything between latitudes 36 and 31. He called this land the Province of Carlana, which would later be changed to "Carolina" for pronunciation, after the Latin form of his own name.

In 1663, Charles II gave the land to eight nobles, the Lords Proprietors, who ruled the Province of Carolina as a proprietary colony. After the Yamasee War of 1715-1717, the Lords Proprietors came under increasing pressure and were forced to relinquish their charter to the Crown in 1719. The proprietors retained their right to the land until 1719, when the colony was officially split into the provinces of North Carolina and South Carolina, crown colonies.

In April 1670 settlers arrived at Albemarle Point, at the junction of the Ashley River and Cooper River. They founded Charles Town, named in honor of King Charles II. Throughout the Colonial Period, the Carolinas participated in many wars against the Spanish and the Native Americans, including the Yamasee and Cherokee tribes. In its first decades, the colony's plantations were relatively small and its wealth came from Indian trade, mainly in Indian slaves and deerskins. The slave trade affected tribes throughout the Southeast, and historians estimate that Carolinians exported 24,000-51,000 Indian slaves from 16701717, sending them to markets ranging from Boston to the Barbados.[5] Planters financed the purchase of African slaves by their sale of Indians.

18th century

In the 1700-1770 era the colony possessed many advantages - entrepreneurial planters and businessmen, a major harbor, cost-efficient African slave labor and an attractive physical environment, with rich soil and a long growing season, albeit with endemic malaria. It became one of the wealthiest of the British colonies. Rich colonials became avid consumers of services from outside the colony, such as mercantile services, medical education, and legal training in England. Almost everyone in 18th-century South Carolina felt the pressures, constraints, and opportunities associated with the growing importance of trade.[6]

Yamasee war

A pan-Indian alliance rose up against the settlers in the Yamasee War (17151717) and nearly destroyed the colony. But the Yamasee were defeated and with exposure to European infectious diseases, the backcountry's Yamasee population was greatly reduced.[7]

Slaves

After the Yamasee war, the planters turned exclusively to importing African slaves for labor. They used their labor to create rice and indigo plantations as commodity crops. Building dams, irrigation ditches and related infrastructure, enslaved Africans created the equivalent of huge earthworks to regulate water for the rice culture.

The Gullah people comprised a large fraction of the enslaved people who were brought to South Carolina. The distinctive Gullah/Geechee culture was a product not of isolation, but rather of interaction with American society with non-African alternatives in full view. The Gullah adapted to multiple factors in American society, while at the same time marketing or otherwise using their distinctive lifeways, products, and language to perpetuate their unique ethnic and racial identity.[8]

Low Country

The Low Country was settled first, dominated by wealthy men who became owners of large amounts of land on which they created plantations.[9] They first transported white indentured servants as laborers, mostly teenage youth from England who came to work off their passage in hopes of learning to farm and buying their own land. Planters also imported African laborers to the colony. In the early colonial years, social boundaries were fluid between indentured laborers and slaves, and there was considerable intermarriage. Gradually the terms of enslavement became more rigid and slavery became a racial caste. With a decrease in English settlers as the economy improved in England before the beginning of the 18th century, the planters began to rely chiefly on enslaved Africans for labor.

The market for land functioned efficiently and reflected both rapid economic development and widespread optimism regarding future economic growth. The frequency and turnover rate for land sales were tied to the general business cycle; the overall trend was upward, with almost half of the sales occurring in the decade before the American Revolution. Prices also rose over time, parallel with the rise in the price for rice. Prices dropped dramatically, however, in the years just before the war, when fears arose about future prospects outside the system of English mercantilist trade.[10]

Back country

In contrast to the Tidewater, the back country was settled chiefly by Scots-Irish and North British migrants who had quickly moved down from Pennsylvania and Virginia. The immigrants from Ulster, the Scottish lowlands and the north of England (the border counties) comprised the largest group from the British Isles before the Revolution. They came mostly in the 18th century, later than other colonial immigrants. Such "North Britons were a large majority in much of the South Carolina upcountry." The character of this environment was "well matched to the culture of the British borderlands." [11] Such immigrants settled in the backcountry throughout the South and relied on subsistence farming. They mostly did not own slaves. Given the differences in background, class, slaveholding, economics and culture, there was longstanding competition between the Low Country and Upcountry that played out in politics.

Revolutionary War

John Rutledge had many roles in South Carolina's history throughout the American Revolution.

Main article: South Carolina during the American Revolution

Prior to the American Revolution, the British began taxing American colonies to raise revenue. Residents of South Carolina were outraged by the Townsend Acts that taxed tea, paper, wine, glass, and oil. To protest the Stamp Act, South Carolina sent wealthy rice planter Thomas Lynch, twenty-six-year-old lawyer John Rutledge, and Christopher Gadsden to the Stamp Act Congress, held in 1765 in New York. Other taxes were removed, but tea taxes remained. Soon South like the Boston Tea Party, began to dump tea into the Charleston Harbor, followed by boycotts and protests.

South Carolina set up its state government and constitution on March 26, 1776. Because of the colony's longstanding trade with Great Britain, the Low Country cities had numerous Loyalists. Many of the battles fought in South Carolina during the American Revolution were against loyalist Carolinians and the Cherokee tribe allied with the British. This was to British General Henry Clinton's advantage, as his strategy was to march his troops north from St. Augustine and sandwich George Washington in the North. Clinton alienated Loyalists and enraged Patriots by attacking and nearly annihilating a fleeing army of Patriot soldiers who posed no threat.

White colonists were not the only ones with a desire for freedom. Estimates are that about 25,000 slaves escaped, migrated or died during the disruption of the war, 30 percent of the state's slave population. About 13,000 joined the British, who had promised them freedom if they fought with them. From 1770 to 1790, the proportion of the state's population made up of blacks (almost all of whom were enslaved), dropped from 60.5 percent to 43.8 percent.[17]

On October 7, 1780, at Kings Mountain, John Sevier and William Campbell, assaulted the 'high heel' of the wooded mountain, the smallest area but highest point, while the other seven groups, led by Colonels Shelby, Williams, Lacey, Cleveland, Hambright, Winston and McDowell attacked the main Loyalist position by surrounding the 'ball' base beside the 'heel' crest of the mountain. North and South Carolinians and attacked British Major Patrick Ferguson and his body of Loyalists on a hilltop. This was a major victory for the patriots, especially because it was won by militiamen and not trained Continentals. Thomas Jefferson called it "The turn of the tide of success."[18] It was the first patriot victory since the British had taken Charleston. While tensions mounted between the Crown and the Carolinas, some key southern Pastors became a target of King George: "...this church (Bullock Creek) was noted as one of the "Four Bees" in King George's bonnet due to its pastor, Rev. Joseph Alexander, preaching open rebellion to the British Crown in June 1780. Bullock Creek Presbyterian Church was a place noted for being a Whig party stronghold. Under a ground swell of such Calvin protestant leadership, South Carolina moved from a back seat to the front in the war against tyranny. Patriots went on to regain control of Charleston and South Carolina with untrained militiamen by trapping Colonel Banastre "No Quarter" Tarleton's troops along a river.

In 1787, John Rutledge, Charles Pinckney, Charles Cotesworth Pinckney, and Pierce Butler went to Philadelphia where the Constitutional Convention was being held and constructed what served as a detailed outline for the U.S. Constitution. The federal Constitution was ratified by the state in 1787. The new state constitution was ratified in 1790 without the support of the Upcountry.

Scots Irish

During the American Revolution the Scots Irish in the back country in most states were noted as strong patriots. One exception was the Waxhaw settlement on the lower Catawba River along the North Carolina-South Carolina boundary, where Loyalism was strong. The area experienced two main settlement periods of Scotch Irish. During the 1750s-1760s, second- and third-generation Scotch Irish Americans moved from Pennsylvania, Virginia, and North Carolina. This particular group had large families, and as a group they produced goods for themselves and for others. They generally were patriots.

Just prior to the Revolution, a second stream of immigrants came directly from northern Ireland via Charleston. This group was forced to move into an underdeveloped area because they could not afford expensive land. Most of this group remained loyal to the crown or neutral when the war began. Prior to Charles Cornwallis's march into the backcountry in 1780, two-thirds of the men among the Waxhaw settlement had declined to serve in the army. British victory at the Battle of the Waxhaws resulted in anti-British sentiment in a bitterly divided region. While many individuals chose to take up arms against the British, the British themselves forced the people to choose sides.[19]

 

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/d/d2/Revolutionary_War_-_Major_Operations_in_the_South_1781.Dean.USMA.edu.history.gif

pdf file on this web site

http://www.clemson.edu/caah/cedp/cudp/pubs/lambert/lambert.pdf

South Carolina Loyalists in the American Revolution

http://www.earlyamerica.com/review/2002_summer_fall/pows.htm

-Rebel- Prisoners Detained in North America

John Thornton envoy to England

United States 1789-03-1789-08

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:United_States_1789-03-1789-08.png

File:United States 1789-03-1789-08.png

Territorial evolution of the United States 

 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Territorial_evolution_of_the_United_States

March 4, 1789

The United States Constitution came into effect, forming the new nation. Note that the states ratified at different times, but to simplify the map, the final result is shown here.

The United States achieved independence from the Kingdom of Great Britain with the Treaty of Paris on September 3, 1783, which established that the thirteen colonies were sovereign and independent states. The borders were established by Article 2 of the treaty, but with a couple of issues. First, it stated that the border would run west from the Lake of the Woods to the Mississippi River - at the time, it was not known that the headwaters of the Mississippi lay south of such a line, so the border has since been taken to run south from the lake to the river.[3]

Some peculiarities to point out to those familiar only with the current borders: Many states had sea-to-sea grants from the British crown that they would not give up easily, so prior to this date, they ceded this land to the federal government in exchange for their Revolutionary War debts. However, Georgia did not do so until much later, and Connecticut ceded most land but kept its Western Reserve. Virginia ceded its claim to the territory north and west of the Ohio River, and this land became unorganized territory. North Carolina also ceded its claim to its western counties, but this was not officially accepted by Congress until 1790. New York ceded its claim on the Erie Triangle to the federal government. At this point in history, all of the states except for Georgia and Virginia were at their present-day borders, except for some of the minor issues mentioned above.

West Florida claimed a border further north than what the United States said it had. Its border had been 31 north when Spain ceded it to the United Kingdom. The British later moved its border north to 3238′ latitude, but when Spanish Florida was ceded back to Spain in the Treaty of Paris, the British cited the original border at the 31st parallel north, but Spain continued to claim the higher border.[4] Also, the borders at the northern area of the Maine District of Massachusetts and the area northwest of Lake Superior remained disputed.

The Wedge, disputed since the 17th century, remained a point of contention between Delaware and Pennsylvania.

The Vermont Republic was a complex matter, with areas being claimed by New York and New Hampshire, but it existed as a de facto unrecognized independent state.

United States 1789-08-1790-04.png
August 7, 1789

The United States Congress affirmed the organization of the Territory North West of the Ohio River, or Northwest Territory, under the terms of the Northwest Ordinance.[5] Northwest Territory consisted of present-day Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, northeastern Minnesota, most of Ohio, and Wisconsin. The Northwest Territory had previously been organized under the Articles of Confederation on July 13, 1787, and was slightly modified under the new Constitution.

 

 United States 1818-12-1819-03

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Territorial_evolution_of_the_United_States

December 3, 1818

The southern portion of Illinois Territory was admitted as the 21st state, Illinois. The remainder was reassigned to Michigan Territory. The unorganized lands which had been a part of Indiana Territory prior to the admission of Indiana as a state were also assigned to Michigan Territory.

File:United States 1818-12-1819-03.png

 

United States 1819-03-1819-12

 

March 2, 1819

The southern part of Missouri Territory was organized as Arkansaw Territory, consisting of present-day Arkansas as well as part of Oklahoma.[27] It was not officially spelled Arkansas until later.

File:United States 1819-03-1819-12.png

 

United States 1824-1828

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:United_States_1824-1828.png

November 15, 1824

Arkansas Territory was shrunk, the western portion becoming unorganized.[

File:United States 1824-1828.png

 

United States 1836-03-1836

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:United_States_1836-03-1836-06.png

March 2, 1836

The Republic of Texas achieved independence from Mexico, though with a large portion of the territory disputed. It had control over the eastern half of present-day Texas, and disputed the western half, as well as portions of Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico, and Wyoming. Miller County in Arkansas Territory now intruded on the borders of Texas, and the people there began to take a Texian identity, leading to both governments having representatives from the county

File:United States 1836-03-1836-06.png

United States 1836-06-1836-07

 

June 15, 1836

Arkansas Territory was admitted as the 25th state, Arkansas. It continued to claim Miller County, with increasing irrelevance

 

File:United States 1836-06-1836-07.png

United States 1845-12-1846-06

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:United_States_1845-12-1846-06.png

December 29, 1845

The Republic of Texas was admitted as the 28th state, Texas. The United States Congress passed the joint resolution of annexation on March 1, 1845,[37] but Texas did not agree to join the union for some time after. Although the annexation resolution avoided specifying Texas's boundaries, the U.S. inherited Texas's unenforced claims to South Texas, West Texas, over half of New Mexico, a third of Colorado, and small parts of Oklahoma, Kansas and Wyoming. With Texas joining the union, Arkansas finally gave up its claim on Miller County.
File:United States 1845-12-1846-06.png

 

United States 1850-1853-03

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:United_States_1850-1853-03.png

September 9, 1850

The Compromise of 1850 divided the Mexican Cession and land claimed by Texas but ceded to the federal government in exchange for taking on its debts. The western portion was admitted as the 31st state, California, most of the rest was organized as Utah Territory and New Mexico Territory, and a small portion became unorganized land.[43] New Mexico Territory consisted of most of present-day Arizona and New Mexico, as well as a southern portion of Colorado and the southern tip of Nevada. Utah Territory consisted of present-day Utah, most of Nevada, and portions of Colorado and Wyoming. A peculiarity appeared at this time, when a small strip of land north of Texas was not officially assigned by any state or territory; this came to be called the Neutral Strip or "No Man's Land", which corresponds to the present-day panhandle of Oklahoma.

File:United States 1850-1853-03.png

 

United States 1861-02-04-1861-02

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:United_States_1861-02-04-1861-02-28.png

February 4, 1861

The Confederate States of America (CSA) was formed. The Southern states seceded at different dates and joined the CSA at different dates; to simplify the map, only the final form of the CSA is shown here. There were rebel governments as well as Union governments in Kentucky and Missouri, and the CSA had full control over Indian Territory. To view a detailed animated map depicting the various state secessions see CSA states evolution.

File:United States 1861-02-04-1861-02-28.png

 

United States 1861-08-1862

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:United_States_1861-08-1862.png

August 1, 1861

The Confederacy established Arizona Territory (CSA) in the southern half of the Union's New Mexico Territory. It would be organized on February 14, 1862. It corresponded to the southern halves of present-day Arizona and New Mexico

File:United States 1861-08-1862.png

 

United States 1863-02-1863-03

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:United_States_1861-08-1862.png

February 24, 1863

The Union created its own Arizona Territory, splitting it off from New Mexico Territory, making both territories correspond to their present-day states, except for Arizona Territory including the southern tip of present-day Nevada

File:United States 1863-02-1863-03.png

 

 

United States 1865-1866

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:United_States_1861-08-1862.png

April 9, 1865

The main army of the Confederate States of America surrendered, and the Confederacy dissolved soon afterward. Much of the Confederate States' territory had already been retaken by force of arms prior to this point and the process of Reconstruction and readmission to the union would take several years following the Confederacy's collapse; to simplify the map, the former Confederate states are shown as already readmitted. To view a detailed animated map depicting the various state readmission during Reconstruction see CSA states evolution.

File:United States 1865-1866.png

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:United_States_1861-08-1862.png

January 14, 1963

The Chamizal Dispute with Mexico over about 600 acres (2.4 km2) on the U.S.-Mexico border between El Paso, Texas, and Ciudad Jurez, Chihuahua is resolved. It was caused by differences between the bed of the Rio Grande as surveyed in 1852 and the present channel of the river.

 

1970

The city of Rio Rico, Texas, was ceded to Mexico in the Boundary Treaty of 1970. The handover officially took place in 1977 and the city was added to the Mexican state of Tamaulipas.

 

 

 

Arkansas Maps

1895 U.S. Atlas

http://www.livgenmi.com/1895/

1895 Pike County Map

http://www.pcahs.org/maps/1895PikeCountyMap.htm

1895 Clark County Map

http://www.livgenmi.com/1895/AR/County/clark.htm

 

http://files.usgwarchives.net/ar/clark/land/clark.txt CLARK CO., ARK., FEDERAL LAND RECORDS This file was compiled from the Bureau of Land Management land records 

and includes Homestead and Cash Entry Patents before 1908 for what is now Clark Co, AR. 

This compilation was created by Joy Fisher, sdgenweb@yahoo.com and is part of the free service called ARGenWeb. 

The front door is located at http://www.usgenweb.com/ar

This file may be freely copied for non-profit purposes. All other rights reserved. 

There are also Huffman and other related family names on this list and site!

L Name         F Name MI Sec No T R Acres Date Remarks
THORNTON ABNER E 3 9S 22W 80 1837/04/15  
THORNTON  ABNER E 3 9S 22W 40 1837/08/01  
THORNTON ABNER E 10 9S 22W 40 1837/04/15  
THORNTON ABNER E 10 9S 22W 80 1837/08/01  
THORNTON  AMANDA   30 8S 21W 0 1859/07/01  
THORNTON AMANDA   30 8S 21W 141.8 1859/07/01  
THORNTON ANDREW J 11 9S 22W 80 1837/08/01  

http://www.usgwarchives.net/ar/clark/clark.htm

Cemeteries: Clark County

Description of file Size Date Contributor
Tombstone Photo Page
Abner Highnight 1kb 21 Aug 2003 ???
Beirne Cemetery 7kb 23 Mar 2010 Becky Smith-Schee
Brushy Creek Cemetery 30kb 20 May 1997 JoAnn Curbo
Bethel Springs Cemetery 7kb 25 Jan 2005 Shirley Cagle
Calloway Holder Cemetery 2kb 05 Nov 2006 Shirley Cagle
Copeland Ridge Cemetery 30kb 29 Nov 2004 Shirley Cagle
Davis Cemetery 7kb 05 Nov 2006 Shirley Cagle
Davis Cemetery 4kb 23 Mar 2010 Becky Smith-Schee
Decipher Cemetery 7kb Nov 2006 Karla Craig
Hart Cemetery 7kb 10 Oct 1999 Sheena Carson
Hart's Chapel Church & Cemetery 21kb 27 Jun 1998 Rebecca Scott-Pharr
Methodist Cemetery 2kb 19 Apr 1997 Jimmy Allen
Osborn Family Cemetery 2kb 19 Apr 1997 Jimmy Allen
Old Rome Cemetery 13kb 05 Nov 2006 Shirley Cagle
Sandy Community Cemetery 3kb 02 Mar 2005 Shirley Cagle
Shady Grove Cemetery 5kb 23 Mar 2010 Becky Smith-Schee
Sloan Cemetery 4kb 04 Dec 1999 Cathy Sloan
Vaden Cemetery 4kb 23 Mar 2010 Becky Smith-Schee

 

http://files.usgwarchives.net/ar/clark/census/1830/1830cens.txt

1830 Federal Census - Clark Co, AR

Submitted by: Kim Straight <straight-cos1@kaman.com> Date: 30 Jun 1996 Copyright. All rights reserved. http://www.usgwarchives.net/copyright.htm

 ***********************************************************

  MALES

<5 yrs

MALES

5-10 yrs

MALES

10-15 yrs

MALES

15-20

MALES

20-30

MALES

30-40

MALES

40-50

MALES

50-60

MALES

60-70

MALES

70-80

FEMALES

<5 yrs

FEMALES

5-10 yrs

FEMALES

10-15 yrs

FEMALES

15-20

FEMALES

20-30

FEMALES

30-40

FEMALES

40-50

FEMALES

50-60

FEMALES

60-70

FEMALES

70-80

SLAVES TOWNSHIP
Thornton, Abner E. 0 0 0 0 1             1 0 0 0 1           Antoine
Thornton, William 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1       0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1     Antoine
   
1895 Hempstead County Map

http://www.livgenmi.com/1895/AR/County/hempstead.htm

1895 Nevada County Map

http://www.livgenmi.com/1895/AR/County/nevada.htm

1895 Pulaski County Map

http://www.livgenmi.com/1895/AR/County/pulaski.htm

1895 ARKANSAS INDEX TO CITIES & TOWNS

http://www.livgenmi.com/1895/AR/Index/

http://www.livgenmi.com/1895/AR/Index/h.htm

 

 

COUNTY SEATS IN CAPS

City or Town Name

Population

County

Area of State

Has Post Office?

Has Railroad?

Has Express Office?

Hope 1937 Hempstead Southwest Yes Yes Yes

 

http://www.livgenmi.com/1895/AR/Index/l.htm
COUNTY SEATS IN CAPS

City or Town Name

Population

County

Area of State

Has Post Office?

Has Railroad?

Has Express Office?

LITTLE ROCK 25874 Pulaski Central Yes Yes Yes

 

http://www.livgenmi.com/1895/AR/Index/o.htm
COUNTY SEATS IN CAPS

City or Town Name

Population

County

Area of State

Has Post Office?

Has Railroad?

Has Express Office?

Okolona 400 Clark Southwest Yes No No
Olmstead   Pulaski Central Yes No No

 

http://www.livgenmi.com/1895/AR/Index/p.htm
COUNTY SEATS IN CAPS

City or Town Name

Population

County

Area of State

Has Post Office?

Has Railroad?

Has Express Office?

PRESCOTT 1287 Nevada Southwest Yes Yes Yes

 

http://www.livgenmi.com/1895/AR/Index/t.htm
COUNTY SEATS IN CAPS

City or Town Name

Population

County

Area of State

Has Post Office?

Has Railroad?

Has Express Office?

TEXARKANA 3528 Miller Southwest Yes Yes Yes
Thornton 406 Calhoun South Yes Yes Yes

 

http://www.livgenmi.com/1895/AR/Index/w.htm
COUNTY SEATS IN CAPS

City or Town Name

Population

County

Area of State

Has Post Office?

Has Railroad?

Has Express Office?

WASHINGTON 519 Hempstead Southwest Yes Yes Yes
Woolsey   Washington Northwest No Yes Yes

 

   

 

          In 1803, the Louisiana Purchase was acquired by the United States, and, in 1819, Arkansas was organized as a territory. Its northern, eastern and southern borders were the same as they are now, but to the west, some of what is now Oklahoma was included. Two years later, in 1821, the territorial capital was moved from Arkansas Post to Little Rock.
          By 1836, the Arkansas Territory had the 60,000 residents required to become a state, and after writing an acceptable constitution, was declared the 25th state in the United States.
          At the approach of the Civil War it was one of several states that seceded from the Union in May of 1861. When the war ended, Arkansas was readmitted in 1868. Like most southern states, the reconstruction period for Arkansas was turbulent. The depression of the 1930s hurt the state's cotton economy and many farmers left. The second world war brought further population loss as men went to work in war factories in other parts of the country but the war promoted new industries within the state and especially aluminum related businesses.
          The Capitol of Arkansas is Little Rock. The Arkansas economy today is dominated by agriculture. Cotton, soybeans, corn and rice are a few of the successful crops grown in the region. The State Bird of Arkansas is the Mockingbird and the State Flower is the Apple Blossom.

http://www.argenweb.net/

http://www.tngenweb.org/maps/tanner-ar-1832.jpg

Arkansas County May 1832

 

 

http://www.histopolis.com/Place/US/AR/Hempstead_County
Clark County, Arkansas, United States

http://www.histopolis.com/Place/US/AR/Clark_County

Details for Clark County

Name Clark County
Place Type County
Located in
County Seat Arkadelphia (Caddo Township)
Coordinates
Latitude 34.0500991 34 03' 00.4" N
Longitude -93.1668395 93 10' 00.6" W
Population 21,437
Elevation 104 m
Surrounding Counties Garland N
Hot Spring NE
Dallas E
Ouachita SE
Nevada S
Hempstead SW
Pike W
Montgomery NW
USGS GNIS FeatureID 66845
Histopolis Place ID 754115364

 

Hempstead County, Arkansas, United States

Details for Hempstead County

Name Hempstead County
Place Type County
Located in
County Seat Hope (De Roan Township)
Coordinates
Latitude 33.7167838 33 43' 00.4" N
Longitude -93.6668459 93 40' 00.6" W
Population 21,621
Elevation 107 m
Surrounding Counties Clark NE
Nevada E
Lafayette S
Miller SW
Little River W
Sevier NW
Howard NW
Pike N
USGS GNIS FeatureID 66858
Histopolis Place ID 494398213

Nevada County, Arkansas, United States

http://www.histopolis.com/Place/US/AR/Nevada_County

Details for Nevada County

Name Nevada County
Place Type County
Located in
County Seat Prescott (Missouri Township)
Coordinates
Latitude 33.6501151 33 39' 00.4" N
Longitude -93.3335037 93 20' 00.6" W
Population 10,101
Elevation 98 m
Surrounding Counties Clark N
Ouachita E
Columbia S
Lafayette SW
Hempstead W
Pike NW
USGS GNIS FeatureID 69169
Histopolis Place ID 136687385

 

Townships of Nevada County

http://www.histopolis.com/Place/US/AR/Nevada_County#AdminDev

13 Townships

Alabama Albany Boughton Caney
Emmet Georgia Jackson Leake
Missouri Parker Redland Taylor
Union
Cemeteries of Nevada County

http://www.histopolis.com/Place/US/AR/Nevada_County#AdminDev

38 Cemeteries, 4 Alternate Names (*) (Cemetery is assumed unless noted)

Artesian Barksdale Bluff City Bluff Springs
Buchanan Christopher Clark Corinth
Craven DeAnn Dunn Ebenezer
Falcon Glenville (* Black) Gulley Holly Springs
Laneburg Lebanon Martin McKinney
Mount Moriah Mount Vernon (Black) Mt. Moriah (*) New Home
Providence Rocky Mound Round Oak Saint Johns
Saint Peters Serepta Spring Smyrna Snell
St. Johns (*) St. Peters (*) Sweet Home Tick Hill
Union Waldrep Washington Hill Watts
Westmoreland White Church
Pike County, Arkansas, United States

http://www.histopolis.com/Place/US/AR/Pike_County

Details for Pike County

Name Pike County
Place Type County
Located in
County Seat Murfreesboro (Thompson Township)
Coordinates
Latitude 34.1501060 34 09' 00.4" N
Longitude -93.6668516 93 40' 00.7" W
Population 10,086
Elevation 187 m
Surrounding Counties Montgomery N
Hot Spring E
Clark E
Nevada SE
Hempstead S
Howard W
Polk NW
USGS GNIS FeatureID 69173
Histopolis Place ID 406932276

 

Pulaski County, Arkansas, United States

http://www.histopolis.com/Place/US/AR/Pulaski_County

Details for Pulaski County

Name Pulaski County
Place Type County
Located in
County Seat Little Rock (Big Rock Township)
Coordinates
Latitude 34.7667584 34 46' 00.3" N
Longitude -92.3001509 92 18' 00.5" W
Population 349,660
Elevation 67 m
Surrounding Counties White NE
Lonoke E
Jefferson SE
Grant S
Saline W
Perry W
Faulkner N
USGS GNIS FeatureID 69177
Histopolis Place ID 248884137

 

White County, Arkansas, United States

http://www.histopolis.com/Place/US/AR/White_County

Details for White County

Name White County
Place Type County
Located in
County Seat Searcy (Gray Township)
Coordinates
Latitude 35.2503629 35 15' 01.3" N
Longitude -91.7334709 91 44' 00.5" W
Population 54,676
Elevation 77 m
Surrounding Counties Independence N
Jackson NE
Woodruff E
Prairie S
Lonoke S
Pulaski SW
Faulkner W
Cleburne NW
USGS GNIS FeatureID 69906
Histopolis Place ID 934625214

 

Royal Township, White County, Arkansas, United States

http://www.histopolis.com/Place/US/AR/White_County/Township_of_Royal

Details for Royal Township

Name Royal Township
Official Name Township of Royal
Place Type Township
Located in
Surveys
Coordinates
Latitude 35.1153635 35 06' 55.3" N
Longitude -92.0084787 92 00' 30.5" W
Elevation 84 m
Surrounding Townships Coffey NE
Antioch NE
Union SE
Ward (Lonoke County) SE
Caroline (Lonoke County) S
Magness (Lonoke County) SW
El Paso W
Jefferson NW
Cleveland NW
USGS GNIS FeatureID 69850
Histopolis Place ID 755841991

 

Cemeteries of White County

http://www.histopolis.com/Place/US/AR/White_County#Cemeteries

54 Cemeteries, 1 Alternate Name (*) (Cemetery is assumed unless noted)

 

 

   
   

 

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